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The Philadelphia Print Shop, Ltd.Historical Prints

Prints of George Washington


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Small Lifetime portraits of Washington


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J. Wright: Washington
J. Wright. "G. Washington." From James Hardie's The New Universal Biographical Dictionary . . . New York: New York: 1801-1805. Stipple engraving by J. Collyer. 5 1/2 x 3 3/4 (platemarks) plus full margins. Soiling bottom right hand side not affecting image. Strong strike. $275



Washington Family Sartain
Edward Savage. [The Washington Family]. "George Washington Parke Custis, Gen: Geo. Washington, Eleanor Parke Custis, Martha Washington, and William Lee." Philadelphia, circa. 1850. Mezzotint by John Sartain. 16 1/2 x 23 1/2 (image) with approx. 1 1/2" margin all around; 3 inch repaired tear at lower right corner, minor chips in margins. Lacking title. Strong image. Hand colored.

The Edward Savage (1761-1817) painting of George Washington and his family was a classic as soon as it was created, and the artist commissioned an engraving which appeared as early as 1798. This print by John Sartain was published in the mid 1850s when patriotic concern over the dissolution of the United States was a major concern for patriotic thinkers. This is the kind of exquisite mezzotint that would have graced parlors and boardrooms in America, and this one was probably trimmed at some time to save money on glass or molding. All the persona of Washington's family are here, including his favorite manservant William Lee. Of the many portraits of the Washington family subsequent to the deaths of both sitter and artist, this is the only separately issued engraving according to Baker's The Engraved Portraits of Washington (item 133). $550



Marshall's Washington
William E. Marshall after Gilbert Stuart. "G. Washington." New York: W.E. Marshall, 1862. 13 3/8 x 11 1/4. Steel engraving by W.E. Marshall. Very good condition.

An excellent engraving of George Washington by William E. Marshall, based on the famous oil portrait in the Boston Athenaeum by Gilbert Stuart. Marshall was well known for his superb portrait of Lincoln, issued in 1866, and for his equally fine engraving of Grant issued a few years later. Those prints were perhaps inspired in part by this excellent portrait of Washington. It was issued as a subscriber's print for The Christian Union, a newspaper published by J.B. Ford & Co. One of the best mid-nineteenth century portraits of the first president by an artist who would later produce what is often considered the best contemporary portrait of the 16th president. $600



Faed: Washington
John Faed. "Washington Receiving a Salute on the Field of Trenton." "Go. Washington." [facsimile signature]. New York: National Art Association of New York, 1865. 23 1/2 x 17 1/2. Steel engraving by William Holl. Excellent impression. Large margins. Bottom right hand corner of margin chipped and expertly replaced. Otherwise, very good condition. Eisen, II, 554.

John Faed (1820-1902) was a prominent English painter who made several portraits of Washington in the course of which he modified the face using both Trumbull and Stuart. This strong image of Washington on a charger, reviewing the troops, is a wonderful portrait with exquisite landscape. Eisen says that the engraver is "Hall" and that he worked for the Kendall Bank Note Company in New York at 285 Broadway during the nineteenth century. We doubt that the engraver mispelled his own name, so this print is done by William Holl (1807-1871) who worked with portraiture in London. Below the title is an explanation that this print was designed to be a premium with a purchase of one of Benson Lossing's books. $1,800



Huntington: Lady Washington's Reception
Daniel F. Huntington. "Lady Washington's Reception." New York: Emil Seitz, ca. 1865. 21 1/2 x 35. Engraving by A.H. Ritchie. Strong impression. Hand color. Faint stain upper right margin corner not affecting image. Print has been professionally conserved. Else, very good condition. Very good condition. Ref: Karal Ann Marling, George Washington Slept Here, 1988.

A superb engraving of Daniel F. Huntington's painting, "The Republican Court in the Time of Washington, or Lady Washington's Reception Day." This painting by the president of the National Academy of Design was designed to show not one particular reception, but rather to be a representative tableau of the Friday evening "teas" held by Martha throughout her husband's term. The scene is filled with symbolism representing the august status conferred on Martha and George in the mid-nineteenth century. The elegance of the surroundings, the richness of the dress of those at the reception, and the formality of the situation and poses all recall a scene from any of the royal courts of Europe in the late eighteenth century. Indeed, it was likely the depicted refinement of the costumes and the obvious high status accorded to these American socialites that most explains the popularity of Huntington's canvas and this elaborate print.

This engraving was a subscription print produced with the intent of generating a profit based on the popularity of the painting. In the nineteenth century, artists were often able to make more money from the sale of prints after their paintings than from the original canvases. Huntington clearly hoped he would benefit in this way, and the public exhibition of the painting in New York City during the fall of 1865 was precisely designed to achieve this end. Huntington hired a superior craftsman to render his image in steel. A.H. Ritchie, the engraver, was one of the best historical printmakers of the mid-nineteenth century. He is particularly known for the clarity and richness of his engravings, and this fine image is an excellent example of his work. The costumes, faces, and architecture are precisely and richly engraved. The merit of this print as an excellent example of historic printmaking from the last century is equaled by its value in depicting how George and Martha Washington were accorded an exalted status in the years following the Civil War. $1,200



Buttre: Martha Washington
W. Oliver Stone after Woolaston. "M. Washington." New York: J.C. Buttre, 1863. 25 7/8 x 18 7/8. Engraving by J.C. Buttre. Margins trimmed to image top and sides. One inch repaired tear into image expertly repaired. 19th century hand color. Old glue stain bottom right hand margin corners. Faint scattered foxing in image. Old slat back stains on back of print. Sold as is. Otherwise, fine condition. $275

A full length portrait of Martha Washington, drawn by W. Oliver Stone after an "original" painting by Woolaston. Martha is shown standing demurely in front of the porch at Mount Vernon, the Potomac River seen in the background. Mrs. Washington is shown as a young woman, yet with enough dignity to well accord her a share of the glory that was being showered on her husband in the mid-nineteenth century.

Prints of Washington by Currier & Ives


Rosenthal: George Washington
Gilbert Stuart. [George Washington]. Philadelphia: M. Rosenthal, 1904. 17 x 13. Mezzotint printed in colors by Max Rosenthal. Signed in plate by the engraver. Edition: 15. Very good condition.

A handsome mezzotint portrait by Philadelphia artist/etcher Max Rosenthal. Rosenthal (1833-1918), born in Russian Poland, studied lithography in Paris at 13, and emigrated to Philadelphia in 1849 or 1850. An active lithographer working with his brothers Louis, Morris and Simon, he also taught mezzotint engraving and oil painting in his later years. Rosenthal also issued a number of large attractive portraits in the early twentieth century such as this mezzotint which is after a painting by Gilbert Stuart. $425



Etchings from the portfolio "The Bicentennial Pageant of George Washington." George Washington Memorial Association, 1932. Plates printed by Henry E. Carling, London, England. Edition 1000. Plates cancelled. Paper watermarked "GW" in circle at lower right, with Washington's coat of arms (shield, crown, and eagle) at upper left. Very good condition.



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